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2017 Publications

Title
AuthorsReferencePMID
Contributions of individual domains to function of the HIV-1 Rev response element.O'Carroll IPThappeta YFan LRamirez-Valdez EASmith SWang YXRein A.J Virol. 2017 Aug 16. pii: JVI.00746-17. doi: 10.1128/JVI.00746-17. [Epub ahead of print]28814520

Dissection of specific binding of HIV-1 Gag to the 'packaging signal' in viral RNA.

Comas-Garcia MDatta SABaker LVarma RGudla PRRein A.Elife. 2017 Jul 20;6. pii: e27055. doi: 10.7554/eLife.27055.28726630

Long Noncoding RNA PURPL Suppresses Basal p53 Levels and Promotes Tumorigenicity in Colorectal Cancer.

Li XLSubramanian MJones MFChaudhary RSingh DKZong XGryder BSindri SMo MSchetter AWen XParvathaneni SKazandjian DJenkins LMTang WElloumi FMartindale JLHuarte MZhu YRobles AIFrier SMRigo FCam MAmbs SSharma SHarris CCDasso MPrasanth KVLal A.Cell Rep. 2017 Sep5;20(10):2408-2423. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2017.08.041.28877474

Prosurvival long noncoding RNA PINCR regulates a subset of p53 targets in human colorectal cancer cells by binding to Matrin 3.

Chaudhary RGryder BWoods WSSubramanian MJones MFLi XLJenkins LMShabalina SAMo MDasso MYang YWakefield LMZhu YFrier SMMoriarity BSPrasanth KVPerez-Pinera PLal A.Elife. 2017 Jun 5;6. pii: e23244. doi: 10.7554/eLife.23244.28580901

Oncogenic Activation of the RNA Binding Protein NELFE and MYC Signaling in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

Dang HTakai AForgues MPomyen YMou HXue WRay DHa KCHMorris QDHughes TRWang XW.Cancer Cell. 2017Jul10;32(1):101-114.e8. doi: 10.1016/j.ccell.2017.06.002.28697339

The Functional Cycle of Rnt1p: Five Consecutive Steps of Double-Stranded RNA Processing by a Eukaryotic RNase III.

Song HFang XJin LShaw GXWang YXJi X.Structure. 2017 Feb 7;25(2):353-363. doi: 10.1016/j.str.2016.12.013. Epub 2017 Jan 19.28111020
Virus-Mediated Alterations in miRNA Factors and Degradation of Viral miRNAs by MCPIP1.  Happel CRamalingam DZiegelbauer JM.PLoS Biol. 2016 Nov 28;14(11):e2000998. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.2000998. eCollection 2016 Nov.27893764

Viral MicroRNAs Repress the Cholesterol Pathway, and 25-Hydroxycholesterol Inhibits Infection.

Serquiña AKPKambach DMSarker OZiegelbauer JM.MBio. 2017 Jul 11;8(4). pii: e00576-17. doi: 10.1128/mBio.00576-17.28698273
    
    

 

 

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pubmed: (caplen n[au] or fel...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=(Caplen N[AU] OR Felber B[AU] OR Franchini V[AU] OR Freed E[AU] OR Gottesman S[AU] OR Grewal S[AU] OR Harris C[AU] OR Hu W[AU] OR Huang J[AU] OR Hughes S[AU] OR Jessup J[AU] OR Ji X[AU] OR Johnson P[AU] OR Kashlev M[AU] OR KewalRamani V[AU] OR Khan J[AU] OR Kwong K[AU] OR Lal A[AU] OR Larson D[AU] OR LeGrice S[AU] OR Luo J[AU] OR Meltzer P[AU] OR Merlino G[AU] OR Mili V[AU] OR Misteli T[AU] OR Oberdoerffer S[AU] OR Pathak V[AU] OR Pavlakis G[AU] OR Rein A[AU] OR Ried T[AU] OR Shapiro B[AU] OR Singer D[AU] OR Staudt L[AU] OR Strathern J[AU] OR Wang Y[AU] OR Wang X[AU] OR Weissman A[AU] OR Young H[AU] OR Zhang Y[AU] OR Zheng ZM[AU] OR Zhurkin V[AU] OR Ziegelbauer J[AU]) AND (Bethesda OR Frederick)
RefCell: multi-dimensional analysis of image-based high-throughput screens based on 'typical cells'.
Related Articles

RefCell: multi-dimensional analysis of image-based high-throughput screens based on 'typical cells'.

BMC Bioinformatics. 2018 Nov 16;19(1):427

Authors: Shen Y, Kubben N, Candia J, Morozov AV, Misteli T, Losert W

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Image-based high-throughput screening (HTS) reveals a high level of heterogeneity in single cells and multiple cellular states may be observed within a single population. Currently available high-dimensional analysis methods are successful in characterizing cellular heterogeneity, but suffer from the "curse of dimensionality" and non-standardized outputs.
RESULTS: Here we introduce RefCell, a multi-dimensional analysis pipeline for image-based HTS that reproducibly captures cells with typical combinations of features in reference states and uses these "typical cells" as a reference for classification and weighting of metrics. RefCell quantitatively assesses heterogeneous deviations from typical behavior for each analyzed perturbation or sample.
CONCLUSIONS: We apply RefCell to the analysis of data from a high-throughput imaging screen of a library of 320 ubiquitin-targeted siRNAs selected to gain insights into the mechanisms of premature aging (progeria). RefCell yields results comparable to a more complex clustering-based single-cell analysis method; both methods reveal more potential hits than a conventional analysis based on averages.

PMID: 30445906 [PubMed - in process]

Intentional transcatheter laceration of the coronary cusp to prevent left main stem obstruction during transcatheter aortic valve implantation: first European experience with the BASILICA technique in a native aortic valve.
Related Articles

Intentional transcatheter laceration of the coronary cusp to prevent left main stem obstruction during transcatheter aortic valve implantation: first European experience with the BASILICA technique in a native aortic valve.

Eur Heart J. 2018 Nov 16;:

Authors: Kasel AM, Khan JM, Greenbaum AB, Michel JM

PMID: 30445638 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Alcohol consumption and lung cancer risk: A pooled analysis from the International Lung Cancer Consortium and the SYNERGY study.
Related Articles

Alcohol consumption and lung cancer risk: A pooled analysis from the International Lung Cancer Consortium and the SYNERGY study.

Cancer Epidemiol. 2018 Nov 13;58:25-32

Authors: Brenner DR, Fehringer G, Zhang ZF, Lee YA, Meyers T, Matsuo K, Ito H, Vineis P, Stucker I, Boffetta P, Brennan P, Christiani DC, Diao N, Hong YC, Landi MT, Morgenstern H, Schwartz AG, Rennert G, Saliba W, McLaughlin JR, Harris CC, Orlow I, Barros Dios JM, Ruano Raviña A, Siemiatycki J, Koushik A, Cote M, Lazarus P, Fernandez-Tardon G, Tardon A, Le Marchand L, Brenner H, Saum KU, Duell EJ, Andrew AS, Consonni D, Olsson A, Hung RJ, Straif K

Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is inadequate evidence to determine whether there is an effect of alcohol consumption on lung cancer risk. We conducted a pooled analysis of data from the International Lung Cancer Consortium and the SYNERGY study to investigate this possible association by type of beverage with adjustment for other potential confounders.
METHODS: Twenty one case-control studies and one cohort study with alcohol-intake data obtained from questionnaires were included in this pooled analysis (19,149 cases and 362,340 controls). Adjusted odds ratios (OR) or hazard ratios (HR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated for each measure of alcohol consumption. Effect estimates were combined using random or fixed-effects models where appropriate. Associations were examined for overall lung cancer and by histological type.
RESULTS: We observed an inverse association between overall risk of lung cancer and consumption of alcoholic beverages compared to non-drinkers, but the association was not monotonic. The lowest risk was observed for persons who consumed 10-19.9 g/day ethanol (OR vs. non-drinkers = 0.78; 95% CI: 0.67, 0.91), where 1 drink is approximately 12-15 g. This J-shaped association was most prominent for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The association with all lung cancer varied little by type of alcoholic beverage, but there were notable differences for SCC. We observed an association with beer intake (OR for ≥20 g/day vs nondrinker = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.90).
CONCLUSIONS: Whether the non-monotonic associations we observed or the positive association between beer drinking and squamous cell carcinoma reflect real effects await future analyses and insights about possible biological mechanisms.

PMID: 30445228 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Myosin-X is essential to the intercellular spread of HIV-1 Nef through tunneling nanotubes.
Related Articles

Myosin-X is essential to the intercellular spread of HIV-1 Nef through tunneling nanotubes.

J Cell Commun Signal. 2018 Nov 15;:

Authors: Uhl J, Gujarathi S, Waheed AA, Gordon A, Freed EO, Gousset K

Abstract
Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are intercellular structures that allow for the passage of vesicles, organelles, genomic material, pathogenic proteins and pathogens. The unconventional actin molecular motor protein Myosin-X (Myo10) is a known inducer of TNTs in neuronal cells, yet its role in other cell types has not been examined. The Nef HIV-1 accessory protein is critical for HIV-1 pathogenesis and can self-disseminate in culture via TNTs. Understanding its intercellular spreading mechanism could reveal ways to control its damaging effects during HIV-1 infection. Our goal in this study was to characterize the intercellular transport mechanism of Nef from macrophages to T cells. We demonstrate that Nef increases TNTs in a Myo10-dependent manner in macrophages and observed the transfer of Nef via TNTs from macrophages to T cells. To quantify this transfer mechanism, we established an indirect flow cytometry assay. Since Nef expression in T cells down-regulates the surface receptor CD4, we correlated the decrease in CD4 to the transfer of Nef between these cells. Thus, we co-cultured macrophages expressing varying levels of Nef with a T cell line expressing high levels of CD4 and quantified the changes in CD4 surface expression resulting from Nef transfer. We demonstrate that Nef transfer occurs via a cell-to-cell dependent mechanism that directly correlates with the presence of Myo10-dependent TNTs. Thus, we show that Nef can regulate Myo10 expression, thereby inducing TNT formation, resulting in its own transfer from macrophages to T cells. In addition, we demonstrate that up-regulation of Myo10 induced by Nef also occurs in human monocyte derived macrophages during HIV-1 infection.

PMID: 30443895 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Last updated by Hooper, Laura (NIH/NCI) [E] on Sep 27, 2017